Georgia Cattle

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Georgia Direct Cattle Summary (Fri)

Georgia Cattle Auctions Daily Summary (Tue-Fri)

Georgia Dairy Auction (2nd & 4th Tue)

Eastanollee Livestock Auction (Tue)

Swainsboro Stockyard Auction (Tue)

Thomaston Livestock Auction (Tue)

Georgia Cattle Auctions Weekly Review (Fri)

Moseley Livestock Auction (Wed)

Dixie Livestock Auction (Wed)

Franklin County Livestock Auction (Wed)

Lanier Farmers Livestock Auction (Wed)

Pulaski County Stockyard Auction (Wed)

Thomasville Stockyard Auction (Wed)

Turner County Stockyard (Thu)

Northeast GA Livestock Auction (Thu)

Seminole Stockyard Auction (Thu)

Jackson Livestock Auction (Thu)

Moultrie Livestock Auction (Thu)

Wilkes County Stockyard Auction (Thu)

Sumter County Livestock (Fri)

Calhoun Stockyard (Fri)

Fitzgerald Livestock Auction (Fri)

Greensboro Livestock Auction (Fri)

Carroll County Livestock Auction (Tue)

Blackshear Livestock Auction (Tue)

Georgia has over 30,000 cattle producers with an average herd size of less than 50 head. Most Georgia farms are cow/calf operations with calves being sold at the local auction barns. The calves which usually weigh between 300 and 500 pounds often go to a forage based stockering program, where they gain another 300 to 400 pounds. Then the feeders which now weigh between 600 and 800 pounds will typically move into feedlots.

A 1,000-pound market steer yields approximately 525 pounds of beef. Of the carcass, 99 percent is either used as meat or recovered as by-products, both edible and inedible, from which are made a wide variety of goods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and clothing. Up to 75 percent of all beef consumed in the US comes from cattle fed in feedyards. Feedlots are increasingly becoming fewer and larger. The states of Texas, Nebraska and Kansas now finish 60 percent of the cattle fed in the United States. Most of Georgia's cattle end up in feedyards in these states.

Agriculture and related agribusiness employ 1 in 6 people in Georgia. The agriculture's direct impact to Georgia's gross product is $6 billion. If you add sales and service, processing and distribution, the total impact is $52 billion dollars.

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CattleToday.com
CattleToday's Q & A Boards are a Cattle Forum for swapping information and asking and answering questions about breed, health problems, beginners questions and jokes about cattle and horses.

What to do when a cow dies?
by ALACOWMAN (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 17:01:23 GMT+5)
Is there drought where your at ? it could be anything from blackleg,to prussic acid poisoning..from Johnson grass to wild cherry leaves.. I would move the cows till I found out...



Protein Tubs
by Caustic Burno (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 16:27:04 GMT+5)
BRYANT wrote:Lucky_P wrote:I know it's really easy to kick those tubs out there, but... dang! they just look like an extremely expensive way to provide a little bit of protein.
I can buy a ton of DDG with 27% CP for $120... but a 200lb 28% tub is upward of $60...
That works out to 22 cents/lb(DDG) vs $1.13/lb(tub) for supplemental protein.
I believe I can spend a few minutes a day toting a few buckets of DDG to get 6X more protein in 'em for the same money.
depends on how far you are from your cattle , I got a place that it cost me 30.00 bucks plus my time to drive to. In this pasture I fill a feeder with range meal but I also use a tub the tub I use is much higher in fat than most but also 28 % protein and its a cooked tub which makes it a lot harder so they don't eat as much as a soft tub but it cost around 60.00 + or - 5.00. I don't use tubs all the time but this place is a place you need dozer to get in if it rains much so I can take a tub in on my ATV if I have to. Tubs have their place.


Around here it works our to about 1.50 a pound for protein and comes to 900 dollars a ton for the tubs mighty expensive supplement.
Same money would buy 30 rolls of decent hay roughly 15 tons of feed.
Never could get that convenience to pencil out.



Extremely Profitable Big Time Operators ?
by bigbull338 (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:06:28 GMT+5)
BFE wrote:I have a friend who contracts with a big hog company. Says it used to be really good, not so much now, but what else are you gonna do with a $750,000 hog barn in the back yard?

I looked into a free range egg set up, similar deal as the hogs. It takes 12 acres and 800,000 to 1,000,000 investment in the building. Gross for the farmer is around 140,000 per year, not including the building. There are a few Mennonites not far from here doing it. If I were to do it, I'd find buy ground somewhere away from my home place and do it there, so if it went tits up on the contract I could be shed of the whole thing. No way am I tying my home place up to be at the mercy of someone else.
with the layer house you can also sell your litter for $10 a ton when you clean out the layer house.theres no telling how much litter is sold around here.



Growing the herd...
by bigbull338 (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:01:58 GMT+5)
congrats on that new grandbaby.



fence tips and tricks
by callmefence (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:59:20 GMT+5)
greybeard wrote:dieselbeef wrote: that wire wont do that with the metal frame like that?

Every once in awhile, but not nearly as bad.
Years ago, decades..all wire I used came on a spool frame like that, but the wire itself had it's own problems. Stretch and stretch and stretch, then get loose again just on it's own and it rusted all the heck. It's why I started using Bekeart ht. A little harder to work with according to some, but in 5 years, it don't look like it was put up in the late 1800s.

Y'all are rolling it out in the wrong direction. North rolls have to rolled to the north. East to the east etc.
It'll be stamped on there somewhere. Sometimes it's pretty small, you gotta look hard.



A few of our 2017 fall calves
by LDEnterprises (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:55:32 GMT+5)
Cute little boogers! Very nice.



House Cats..... anyone?
by greybeard (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:51:33 GMT+5)
Son of Butch wrote:greybeard wrote:Not no but Heck NO. Especially not this time of year.
btdt.

I can see you're undecided... did I mention each come with a nice shiny collar...

Maybe..if the collars were put on with a callicrate bander...



A.J.
by Workinonit Farm (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:37:38 GMT+5)
Happy Birthday.



Potential bargain
by Lazy M (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:24:13 GMT+5)
http://www.superiorlivestock.com/online ... ber=59#lot
Bet you could get a heck of a deal on #59.. Do the poor guy a favor though and make sure you have a good fly rub.



1086 clutch issue
by Ky cowboy (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:22:09 GMT+5)
Well a little update, cab mounts, free play, filters, are all good. The light for the hyd is not coming on in the cab at all. One of my grandad coffee buddies who was a ih tech in il came out and said he was pretty sure the mcv pump was shot. I'm going to try and tear it apart next few days and see. He grounded out the sensor and we still couldn't get the light to come on. And no I didn't test it with a meter or check the bulb. But he said with the trouble I was having he thought the pump was the trouble. Any thoughts/ideas. And any tips on replacing the pump if that's what you guys think it is.

Thanks



Freeze Branding Cattle
by bse (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 14:20:29 GMT+5)
I use Methanol instead of alchohol, works the same a lot easier to get here at the tire store



Pics or it didn't happen
by Hoser (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 13:43:27 GMT+5)
Simmental is the most popular breed in Alberta. The buyers here go crazy for simmi calves.



Best deal on Hay Saving Rings/Feeders
by BFE (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 13:15:11 GMT+5)
-We have the GoBob monster doubles. They save hay and are indestructible. Extremely heavy, though.



New castration band on the market?
by cowbellbecky (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 12:57:59 GMT+5)
Has anyone tried these? Looks pretty easy..
http://www.zipbandit.com



Insurance
by Bestoutwest (Posted Tue, 17 Oct 2017 12:21:46 GMT+5)
Cross-7 wrote:I really don't have an answer to her problem.
I've always been opposed to Obamacare as I don't feel like I should be responsible to supplement someone else's insurance.

Since the dawn of insurance, you have been supplementing those that can't/won't/refuse to pay for insurance. Example: my foot got infected after the surgery I had last November. After numerous tests it was never determined what bug was in there, only which family it was from. I have had heart surgery and have a patch, so I needed to have all bases covered incase the infection spread and then I'd be toast. So, every week I went to the infectious disease folks and got my shopping bag full of medication. I was able to see a bill for it, and my insurance was being charged $8,300 a week, A WEEK! I was talking to a pharmacist later on and he was telling me that the only reason it was that expensive is that others can't/won't/refuse to pay for that.

On a side note, I had a patient that worked for a large pharmaceutical company from the mid 80's up to the 2000's. He was telling me that by the time we see something, the process has cost the company close to $100M and at times closer to $1B, and those are only the ones we see. If you were tell the local man on the street that at $1.15/lb (an arbitrary number) for your calves, he'd probably call you a liar like everyone does the pharmaceutical companies. But think of the infrastructure you have, and the money you have tied up, in just taking your calves to the salebarn.




cattletoday.xml

BEWARE OF POTENTIAL THREAT TO DEER POPULATIONS
Diseases are a big concern for deer biologists and managers. Since the reestablishment of white-tailed deer across the Southeast, hemorrhagic disease has had a negative impact on their populations. Hemorrhagic disease in deer can be caused by epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses, or bluetongue viruses, and is spread by black gnats.
SVF CATTLE COUNTRY COMMERCIAL REPLACEMENT SALE HELD AUG. 31ST
One thousand, one hundred and eleven commercial females from Florida's leading ranchers found ready acceptance at the recent Cattle Country Sale in Brighton, Fla.
IT'S THE PITTS -- A MOTHER'S PLEA
I'm not in the mood today to try and be funny. And normally I don't believe writers should use their podium to preach to people. In most cases I don't have the qualifications or the credentials.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT -- DEMAND-AGGRESSIVE MARKETING BUOY CATTLE PRICES
Cattle numbers continue to grow with national cowherd expansion, and various data suggest herd expansion is continuing this year.
CHUTE-SIDE VACCINE COOLER IS A USEFUL TOOL
A few simple steps can help cattle producers become more effective in battling respiratory disease in their herd, get full value of any vaccine they purchase, and possibly increase their operational profit in the process.
PRODUCERS BENEFIT FROM YEAR-ROUND HERD HEALTH PROGRAM
Many times a producer does not consider or appreciate the value of a good year-round herd health program until confronted with a difficult calving season or an unacceptable level of calf loss from health challenges.
GET CALVES STARTED ON THE RIGHT FOOT AT WEANING
During this time of the year, some producers may consider preconditioning beef calves prior to sale. This involves a multi-step process including weaning, a defined health protocol, nutrition, and marketing plan. The following article describes a few helpful tips for weaning and getting calves started on the right foot:
EARLY WEANING BENEFITS FIRST-CALF COWS
Summer heat can be hard on pastures, cows and calves, especially first-calf cows. These cows are in a special class as they are still trying to maintain body condition, actively grow, support reproduction by gestating with her second calf, and lactating.
PRODUCT HANDLING IS CRITICAL TO HERD HEALTH SUCCESS
The cow-calf production unit is the basis for the entire beef industry. The production of quality calves requires strict attention to the health of all calves, cows and bulls in the facility.
HYDRAULIC CALF TABLES MAKE LIVESTOCK HANDLING EASIER
Chutes and calf tables have made livestock handling easier—on the animals, and for the people doing the job, whether branding, castrating, dehorning, implanting calves, etc.
IT'S THE PITTS -- RATTLED
Despite having lived in, or near, rattlesnake country my entire life I've never known anyone who actually got bit by one, let alone got bit and lived to tell the tale. Until now, that is.
DO YOUR HOMEWORK BEFORE BUYING BULLS
As the bull-buying season gets underway, commercial cattlemen should do their homework to help ensure the bull(s) they purchase this year meet their needs.
PREWEANING CALF MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ADD VALUE TO FEEDERS
The concept of a value added calf (VAC) program is not new today, but in the late 1980's it was thought to have little value in some circles.
THE WORLD ACCORDING TO HOOTER MCCORMICK -- NO WORSTER
LeRoy was ancient. The lines in his face looked deep enough to hide in. His hair, mostly silver now, was still thick; his black eyes continued to sparkle with mischief.
DO HOMEWORK BEFORE HEADING INTO BULL BUYING SEASON
When it comes to genetics, bull selection is the most important decision the cow-calf producer has to make.

Georgia Cattle Links

Associations - Livestock

Cattle*: Chiangus

Cattle*: Gelbvieh

Cattle*: Limousin

Equipment: Trailers: Dealers

Equipment: Trailers: Manufacturers

Government Agencies

Hay, Feeds, Minerals, Supplements

Horses*: Farrier and Horseshoeing

Livestock*: Alpacas, Llamas, Camelids: Llamas: Breeders

Livestock*: Goats: Breeds: Boer: Breeders

Livestock*: Goats: Breeds: Meat Goats

Livestock*: Goats: Breeds: Pygmy: Breeders

Livestock*: Poultry: Equipment and Supplies

Livestock*: Poultry: Landfowl

Livestock*: Sheep: Breeds: Katahdin

Livestock*: Sheep: Breeds: Romney: Breeders

Research - Extension Services

Stockyards and Sale Barns

Associations - Livestock

Barns and Metal Buildings

Cattle*: Beefmaster

Cattle*: Brangus

Cattle*: Hereford

Cattle*: Shorthorn

Cooperatives: Energy

Horses*: Boarding Stables

Livestock*: Goats: Associations

Livestock*: Goats: Breeds: Boer

Products

Real Estate: Appraisers

Real Estate: Appraisers: Commercial Appraisers

Real Estate: Farm Real Estate

Real Estate: Farm Real Estate: North America: United States

Ag Universities

Associations - Livestock

Barns and Metal Buildings

Cattle*: Beefmaster

Fencing

Hay, Feeds, Minerals, Supplements

Horses*: Breeds: Paint

Horses*: Breeds: Warmbloods

Real Estate

Travel & Vacations

 


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